Who is the guitarist playing the black Stratocaster?

Jimbo99

Senior Stratmaster
Jun 5, 2021
2,632
Palm Coast, FL
And he plays a stock Indonesian (Samick) Squier Bullet, OEM pickups, tuners, pots, output jack.

"GUITAR WORLD: Jack, when you’re home, are you most like to pick up an acoustic guitar or an electric and an amp?


Well … [laughs] when I’m home, I don't plug in and rock out; I usually sit at my table and play quietly unplugged—or with my acoustic.


An electric guitar has to respond unplugged. Like that Squier Bullet I played during the Gregg tribute show? I never plugged it in at the store, but I knew it would be a great guitar. I just played it acoustically. It had the most response and vibrated great … had a lot of sustain. I’ve had a couple friends play it and they didn’t see any big deal about it—but the low notes are really tight and the high notes have a certain quality."




 

FunGhoul

Strat-Talk Member
Apr 22, 2022
48
New Jersey
Hearing loss

from an interview on jambands,com

Published: 2018/09/22
by Larson Sutton

Jack Pearson: Still Dreaming Big​

Jack Pearson: Still Dreaming Big


Your hearing suffered in your time with The Allman Brothers Band. Has it recovered?

That’s why I quit. I was having terrible problems with it. I still have it. It’s never gone away. I was wearing custom-made earplugs, but it still wasn’t stopping the damage. Dickey and I talked about it a few times. I always loved to play live, but it came to a point where I couldn’t do it to myself anymore. It was one of the hardest decisions I had to make: to quit The Allman Brothers Band. My favorite band. It was very, very tough.

It was the right decision, though.

Yes, I had to. My doctors told me I couldn’t keep doing it to myself. Most of my life I was known as the loudest guitar player in Tennessee. A lot of the damage I did to myself.
 

touch of gray

Strat-O-Master
Jul 10, 2022
547
Bismarck, ND
Hearing loss

from an interview on jambands,com

Published: 2018/09/22
by Larson Sutton

Jack Pearson: Still Dreaming Big​

Jack Pearson: Still Dreaming Big


Your hearing suffered in your time with The Allman Brothers Band. Has it recovered?

That’s why I quit. I was having terrible problems with it. I still have it. It’s never gone away. I was wearing custom-made earplugs, but it still wasn’t stopping the damage. Dickey and I talked about it a few times. I always loved to play live, but it came to a point where I couldn’t do it to myself anymore. It was one of the hardest decisions I had to make: to quit The Allman Brothers Band. My favorite band. It was very, very tough.

It was the right decision, though.

Yes, I had to. My doctors told me I couldn’t keep doing it to myself. Most of my life I was known as the loudest guitar player in Tennessee. A lot of the damage I did to myself.
It was documented that the entire band thought Dickey was too loud, with him using three amps at one point. They also weren’t happy with his decision to quit playing his Les Paul.
 


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