The Weight

Wrighty

Dr. Stratster
Mar 7, 2013
11,603
Harlow, Essex, UK
Einstein did the heavy lifting for you. After seven years, he came up with E=MC2. Energy equals Matter squared by Light. I would explain it to you, but I have to understand it first. In his Second Theory of Relativity, he postulated that the faster you travel, the slower time will go, meaning you could return to Earth younger than when you left.

Obviously, I'll leave it up to you to join the dots, but I think time could indeed have a weight. I look forward to reading a paper on this...
Nothing would have weight if Newton hadn’t invented gravity. It’s science innit? I know about that stuff.
 

Wrighty

Dr. Stratster
Mar 7, 2013
11,603
Harlow, Essex, UK
It's not so difficult to understand. It simply states an equivalency. Basically matter/energy, they're just different forms of the same thing. Sort of like water and steam.

The equation itself just tells what the conversion rate is. The amount of a E(nergy) contained in any quantity of matter = it's m(ass) multiplied by the (c2) the speed of light squared.

c2 provides a constant. c is equal to 186000 miles per second. Square that and it's 34,596,000,000 miles per second. (In kilometers that's 55,353,600,000 per second).

This is why they use various plutonium and uranium isotopes for the big booms. Greater mass = bigger explosions.

As far as time? My personal view is that it's merely an abstraction which allows the human mind to organize the world in a linear fashion because that's the way it works.

In reality everything is happening at the same time. It's only once it's observed that it has to be measured or quantified. (thing Schroedinger's cat).

As far as having "weight" I'm not sure it does, why it would, or what useful purpose it would serve if it did.
‘Time hangs heavy on your hands’?
 

Wrighty

Dr. Stratster
Mar 7, 2013
11,603
Harlow, Essex, UK
My mistake
I apologize
Didn't think it out
I'm sorry
My mother is sorry
My base treatise was sorry
Shoulda
Ast
Does time have mass
@simoncroft knows
Too deep for me! Are you you saying that that the answer is different if you’re asking about time having weight or mass and, therefore the answer to the weight version would depend whether you were on Earth or, say, the moon. It also raises the question that if tge answer to either is ‘yes’, then it has been proven that time slows down as you travel faster. Therefore, tge faster you travel, the lighter you travel. You should get a higher luggage allowance when you travel on a faster aeroplane.
 

GitGeek

Livin' After Midnight
Silver Member
Oct 2, 2020
492
Denver
It's why a plan can fly in a straight line at 35,000 feet, yet circle the earth instead of heading out into space.
Really? I thought it was because the pilot/auto-pilot keeps it at 35,000 feet relative to the ground below. I would think pulling back on the stick would head the plane towards space and break apart in the process.
 

StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
8,962
Altered States
Really? I thought it was because the pilot/auto-pilot keeps it at 35,000 feet relative to the ground below. I would think pulling back on the stick would head the plane towards space and break apart in the process.

Do you think the nose is tilted down? How does it not fly off into space?
 

Baelzebub

Dr. Stratster
Nov 1, 2019
15,389
State of Disbelief
Too deep for me! Are you you saying that that the answer is different if you’re asking about time having weight or mass and, therefore the answer to the weight version would depend whether you were on Earth or, say, the moon. It also raises the question that if tge answer to either is ‘yes’, then it has been proven that time slows down as you travel faster. Therefore, tge faster you travel, the lighter you travel. You should get a higher luggage allowance when you travel on a faster aeroplane.
mass is weight. It's just expressed in Newtons (number of particles) instead of kilograms. EDIT: That's a misstatement. Mass is a measurement of the number of particles. Weight is a measurement of the force exerted by gravity on a given mass.
In this case Earth's gravity is the constant used to determine one when you have the other.
This is why, because gravity is different on different planets, while mass might remain the same, it's weight may increase or decrease.
 
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Baelzebub

Dr. Stratster
Nov 1, 2019
15,389
State of Disbelief
Eienstein once stated that time is what a clock measures.
He also said:

"Time and space are modes by which we think and not conditions in which we live." Which supports my notion that it's a matter of perception and an artificial construct.

and, more importantly he also said:

"The distinction between the past, present and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion."

Everything is all happening at once. We only need time to organize it to our own frames of reference.

This is also the basis of the multiverse, which has gotten a lot of attention of late.
 

Sarnodude

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 26, 2015
6,717
Mukilteo
He also said:

"Time and space are modes by which we think and not conditions in which we live." Which supports my notion that it's a matter of perception and an artificial construct.

and, more importantly he also said:

"The distinction between the past, present and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion."

Everything is all happening at once. We only need time to organize it to our own frames of reference.

This is also the basis of the multiverse, which has gotten a lot of attention of late.
I've always considered Eienstein's quote to be more enigmatic than descriptive.
 


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