The Weight

simoncroft

Still playing. Still learning!
Silver Member
May 30, 2013
19,664
SE England
Does time have weight?
How would it be weighed?
Even though weighty...
Be it shadeable
can one paint it....
Einstein did the heavy lifting for you. After seven years, he came up with E=MC2. Energy equals Matter squared by Light. I would explain it to you, but I have to understand it first. In his Second Theory of Relativity, he postulated that the faster you travel, the slower time will go, meaning you could return to Earth younger than when you left.

Obviously, I'll leave it up to you to join the dots, but I think time could indeed have a weight. I look forward to reading a paper on this...
 

StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
8,936
Altered States
Einstein did the heavy lifting for you. After seven years, he came up with E=MC2. Energy equals Matter squared by Light. I would explain it to you, but I have to understand it first. In his Second Theory of Relativity, he postulated that the faster you travel, the slower time will go, meaning you could return to Earth younger than when you left.

Obviously, I'll leave it up to you to join the dots, but I think time could indeed have a weight. I look forward to reading a paper on this...

Further: Weight is a aspect of gravity but gravity doesn't actually exist. The mass of (large) objects bends space-time to make it appear so. It's why a plan can fly in a straight line at 35,000 feet, yet circle the earth instead of heading out into space. So time has no weight but it's an aspect of it.
 

Kerry Brown

Senior Stratmaster
Mar 5, 2014
1,328
BC, Canada
Does time have weight?
How would it be weighed?
Even though weighty...
Be it shadeable
can one paint it....
Made me think which lead me to this.


Which lead me back to philosophy 101 and Descartes.
 

2010cb

Strat-O-Master
Silver Member
Nov 21, 2020
519
NY
The concept of time is what drove me to study engineering instead of physics.

But time does indeed have a weight. And the weight varies based on other factors.
 

Baelzebub

Dr. Stratster
Nov 1, 2019
15,389
State of Disbelief
Einstein did the heavy lifting for you. After seven years, he came up with E=MC2. Energy equals Matter squared by Light. I would explain it to you, but I have to understand it first. In his Second Theory of Relativity, he postulated that the faster you travel, the slower time will go, meaning you could return to Earth younger than when you left.

Obviously, I'll leave it up to you to join the dots, but I think time could indeed have a weight. I look forward to reading a paper on this...
It's not so difficult to understand. It simply states an equivalency. Basically matter/energy, they're just different forms of the same thing. Sort of like water and steam.

The equation itself just tells what the conversion rate is. The amount of a E(nergy) contained in any quantity of matter = it's m(ass) multiplied by the (c2) the speed of light squared.

c2 provides a constant. c is equal to 186000 miles per second. Square that and it's 34,596,000,000 miles per second. (In kilometers that's 55,353,600,000 per second).

This is why they use various plutonium and uranium isotopes for the big booms. Greater mass = bigger explosions.

As far as time? My personal view is that it's merely an abstraction which allows the human mind to organize the world in a linear fashion because that's the way it works.

In reality everything is happening at the same time. It's only once it's observed that it has to be measured or quantified. (thing Schroedinger's cat).

As far as having "weight" I'm not sure it does, why it would, or what useful purpose it would serve if it did.
 
Last edited:

thomquietwolf

Dr. Stratster
Gold Supporting Member
Silver Member
Dec 2, 2010
20,707
Peardale CA
It's not so difficult to understand. It simply states an equivalency. Basically matter/energy, they're just different forms of the same thing. Sort of like water and steam.

The equation itself just tells what the conversion rate is. The amount of a E(nergy) contained in any quantity of matter = it's m(ass) multiplied by the (c2) the speed of light squared.

c2 provides a constant. c is equal to 186000 miles per second. Square that and it's 34,596,000,000 miles per second. (In kilometers that's 55,353,600,000 per second).

This is why they use various plutonium and uranium isotopes for the big booms. Greater mass = bigger explosions.
Go trolling in the lumber yard???
See what it gets ya
 

bluejazzoid

Strats Amore
Silver Member
Aug 14, 2009
8,785
Southeast USA
dali-time-jeannette-sommers.jpg
 

crankmeister

Most Honored Senior Member
Jul 9, 2020
6,364
Republic of Gilead
Time is in the realm of chaos.

Lists, chronicles, narratives and other symbolic acts are ways that we attempt to give (what we perceive as) time weight and meaning that we hope will be mutually intelligible.
 

ukoldgit

Dr. Stratster
Feb 20, 2018
10,959
Wiltshire UK
Einstein did the heavy lifting for you. After seven years, he came up with E=MC2. Energy equals Matter squared by Light. I would explain it to you, but I have to understand it first. In his Second Theory of Relativity, he postulated that the faster you travel, the slower time will go, meaning you could return to Earth younger than when you left.

Obviously, I'll leave it up to you to join the dots, but I think time could indeed have a weight. I look forward to reading a paper on this...
Read on McDuff🤪
1656144139576.png
 


Top