SG to a Strat

nullaccount

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 12, 2022
1,362
Florida
Look at Sweetwater website for great descriptions and specs about all of these suggestions. They even have info on discontinued Strats.
 

6stringslacker

Strat-Talk Member
Apr 2, 2022
66
USA
Welcome to the club.

I started playing SG's in the late 1970's. Tried a few BC Rich, Fender, Guild and PRS guitars along the way but never bought one. Got a 2006 MiM HSS Strat from a school buddy a few months back and been having a lot of fun with it.

It definitely motivated me to seek out some different sorts of tunes to play.
 

dspellman

Strat-O-Master
Mar 24, 2013
831
Los Angeles
Hi folk, 50 years ago I bought an SG and even though I changed my wife once, I never changed my guitar… but this weekend I’m off to the big smoke to buy myself a Strat!
Would you believe I have never played a Strat so I’m hoping I’m going to get some sort of a thrill.
Nah. If that's what you're looking for, change your wife again. But be sure to take your heart medication.

You'll notice that the strat is not neck heavy. If you're used to supporting the SG in your picking hand, or subtly pushing down on the back of the body with your picking arm, that's over. Be careful, in the latter case, that you don't smack yourself accidentally with the Strat.

You probably won't need to spend all that money on a Strat; you can get a reasonably good one for $200 (US) these days, and $500 if you want fancy. You can definitely spend your budget if you have to have a Fender logo and you can go well beyond if that logo says "Suhr" or Tom Anderson or some such.

Going from a two pickup, three-way switch to a three pickup five-way switch is pretty much the same as getting a new car. You'll play the, "This must be the...uh..." game for a bit, and since it's a longer scale, you may find yourself under shooting the mark (ask your wife about that) now and again, but after a while you'll get the hang of it.
 

RaySachs

Senior Stratmaster
Gold Supporting Member
Jun 25, 2017
1,811
Philly area
+1 on the chassis ergonomics. SGs put the nut the furthest 'to the left' and Strats put the nut the furthest 'to the right' of any guitar pair (Explorer is a little more to the left than SG). Due to bridge placement relative to the thigh cut out when sitting and the strap pin placements when standing.
I agree with the SG part of this statement, but not the strat part. I can play strats (and teles) very comfortably seated. But Les Pauls or any knockoff of a Les Paul puts the nut and the higher frets much farther to the right, at least playing seated. That thigh cut is almost under the neck pickup and pushes everything so far to the right that I have trouble reaching the higher frets. Also my picking ends up over the neck pickup instead of between the neck and bridge and I always end up hitting the neck pickup. I had a PRS for a while with the thigh cut in the same place as a Les Paul and I twisted my back up so much playing that seated, I had to sell it after a few months of trying to adapt - I was literally in pain after 10 minutes. I've had the same problems when I've demo'd LP's lately. The strat has never caused me problems like that.

-Ray
 

wish

New Member!
May 21, 2022
6
Australia
Wow…a. lot happened on this post overnight.
I’m off this morning and will have hopefully something on my return on Tuesday. A lot to do while we are their….doctors, dentists…and Strat shopping.
Will get back to you. Many many thanks for your interest.
Cheers
 

wish

New Member!
May 21, 2022
6
Australia
You seem like the type that likes to get something good and stick with it. I’d recommend a used American Original ’60s. A little over budget but you’ll have it the rest of your life. It has the Pure Vintage 65 pickups. Great neck. Check out any reviews.
Should have done that along time ago 😊
 

StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
7,216
Altered States
There are a lot of SG & Strat players here, myself included.

I think that moving from the SG, you'll definitely want A5 pickups. Something considered a bit hotter vs. vintage mellow. Or a clean boost for the Strat.

The "neck location" difference is something else to be aware of. Because of the different body shape the Strat will feel like the neck is way to the right when you first play it sitting down or standing up. Eventually the difference will fade away.

Most Strat necks are on the thicker side, at least vs. a thin SG. If you have a thick neck SG then it's more similar. Just know that you might want to try a number of necks (C, modern C, V, Deep V, etc ) on the Strats.

Standard Strat pot wiring still seems odd to me, coming from a Gibson world. But it's easily adjustable to something a Gibson guy is used to.

Player series are nice guitars. Also consider the Squier Classic Vibe models. Both can be nice if you find a good one and both well under budget.
 

StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
7,216
Altered States
I agree with the SG part of this statement, but not the strat part. I can play strats (and teles) very comfortably seated. But Les Pauls or any knockoff of a Les Paul puts the nut and the higher frets much farther to the right, at least playing seated. That thigh cut is almost under the neck pickup and pushes everything so far to the right that I have trouble reaching the higher frets. Also my picking ends up over the neck pickup instead of between the neck and bridge and I always end up hitting the neck pickup. I had a PRS for a while with the thigh cut in the same place as a Les Paul and I twisted my back up so much playing that seated, I had to sell it after a few months of trying to adapt - I was literally in pain after 10 minutes. I've had the same problems when I've demo'd LP's lately. The strat has never caused me problems like that.

-Ray

The solution to that is to move the LP (etc) to the left knee i.e. the Classical position. Removes that "my elbow is cramped" feeling. Obviously the SG doesn't suffer from this condition.
 

RaySachs

Senior Stratmaster
Gold Supporting Member
Jun 25, 2017
1,811
Philly area
The solution to that is to move the LP (etc) to the left knee i.e. the Classical position. Removes that "my elbow is cramped" feeling. Obviously the SG doesn't suffer from this condition.
I tried the classical position - couldn’t adapt to it. Then decided at my age, I’m gonna play guitars well adapted to me, rather than trying to adapt to them. There are plenty of great guitars other than Les Pauls - that’s what led me to the SG… Hell, if I tried the classical position with an SG, I don’t think it would be possible to reach the nut.

-Ray
 

StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
7,216
Altered States
I tried the classical position - couldn’t adapt to it. Then decided at my age, I’m gonna play guitars well adapted to me, rather than trying to adapt to them. There are plenty of great guitars other than Les Pauls - that’s what led me to the SG… Hell, if I tried the classical position with an SG, I don’t think it would be possible to reach the nut.

-Ray

Agreed! In fact, I think it might have been playing my SG... then my LP... that led me towards moving the LP to the other leg. Or I just tried it once and it worked for me. Really frees up your arm.

It's not an issue when standing since the LP and the SG sit in roughly the same place. The Strat actually moves in closer, but since it's a 25.5 scale, it all seems to work out OK.
 

wish

New Member!
May 21, 2022
6
Australia
Just spent a bit of time in one guitar place…they are really keen on the Japanese models…..finish, pickups etc.
It was a busy Sunday afternoon there so I will head back tomorrow. Had a bit of a play on the Strat Player but too many people to get serious.
 

nullaccount

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 12, 2022
1,362
Florida
Just spent a bit of time in one guitar place…they are really keen on the Japanese models…..finish, pickups etc.
It was a busy Sunday afternoon there so I will head back tomorrow. Had a bit of a play on the Strat Player but too many people to get serious.
Keep us posted when you get one.
 


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