Epitaphs

Baelzebub

Dr. Stratster
Nov 1, 2019
16,079
State of Disbelief
I won't have a choice but I've often said I wouldn't mind this being played at my memorial:



The old man's sitting there, his head bowed down
Every now and then he'll take a look around
And his eyes reflect the memory-pain of years gone by
He can't regain nostalgic dreams he'll never see again

With trembling hands, he wipes a tear
Many fall like rain, there's one for every year
And his life laid out so clearly now, life that's brought death
So nearly now life once he clung to dearly now lets go

But spare a thought as you pass him by
Take a closer look and you'll say
He's our tomorrow, just as much as we are his yesterday

A lonely grave, and soon forgot
Only wind and leaves lament his mournful song
Yet they shout his epitaph out clear
For anyone who's passing near
It names the person lying here as you
And you, and you, and you

In a similar vein I've always loved this, although it's spoken word as opposed to poetry set to music.

Do not go gentle into that good night​


Dylan Thomas - 1914-1953

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
 

Mouse

The Knees of Rock
Apr 25, 2012
24,168
New Jersey
In a similar vein I've always loved this, although it's spoken word as opposed to poetry set to music.

Do not go gentle into that good night​


Dylan Thomas - 1914-1953

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

It's interesting how words resonate depending on what age you are. I've listened to that JP song hundreds of times but only in recent years did the lyrics resonate deeper with me.

Similarly, it was difficult to appreciate the meaning of Thomas' poem as a student when I first read it.

That said, the older I get the less I'm raging at the dying of the light. Some days I even welcome it.
 

Baelzebub

Dr. Stratster
Nov 1, 2019
16,079
State of Disbelief
It's interesting how words resonate depending on what age you are. I've listened to that JP song hundreds of times but only in recent years did the lyrics resonate deeper with me.

Similarly, it was difficult to appreciate the meaning of Thomas' poem as a student when I first read it.

That said, the older I get the less I'm raging at the dying of the light. Some days I even welcome it.
Interestingly Thomas wrote that as an ode to his father who was losing his eyesight, so there have been several interpretations as to its meaning(s).
I like it because I've never gone quietly into anything that I didn't want to go into. Not to say that's made any difference, but.....
"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,...."
Whether it made any difference or not, I don't know.
 

Butcher of Strats

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 28, 2022
3,066
Maine
Interestingly Thomas wrote that as an ode to his father who was losing his eyesight, so there have been several interpretations as to its meaning(s).
I like it because I've never gone quietly into anything that I didn't want to go into. Not to say that's made any difference, but.....
"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,...."
Whether it made any difference or not, I don't know.
I was raised on Dylan Thomas and in graveyards.

Im guessing youve never been in jail?
One place I dont want to go but always go quietly without fighting as officers put the chains on me...
 

Butcher of Strats

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 28, 2022
3,066
Maine
It's interesting how words resonate depending on what age you are. I've listened to that JP song hundreds of times but only in recent years did the lyrics resonate deeper with me.

Similarly, it was difficult to appreciate the meaning of Thomas' poem as a student when I first read it.

That said, the older I get the less I'm raging at the dying of the light. Some days I even welcome it.
So true how not only different folk read same words different, but same folk read different as time changes perspective.

In a Gospel music thread at the TDPRI I observed that the first song I played live to a big concert audience was Will the Circle be Unbroken.

For one thing it wasnt Gospel to me at the time.
For another thing it brought no feelings of my Mother dying.
Decades later looking back is a whole nother story yet the same event.

As our range of possible responses to life having an end, at least to the mortal portion?
For sure watching my Mother lose the desire to live and then die, did I reckon inform my own sense that observing the wonders humanity spins, while etc etc etc happens, I do not cherish this life so much that I cannot imagine smiling as it draws to a close.

Only if loved ones are sorrowful should I feel sorrow at my own passing. Sorrow for their grief, no reason for grief of my own at death.
 

AntStrat

Dr. Stratster
May 6, 2019
13,690
US
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